About

CONTACT JEN:
jen [at] bornjustright.com
@jenleereeves
@bornjustright
Jen’s personal Facebook page
Born Just Right Facebook page

Every child is born just right. This site is a place where parents can come to share stories, read stories and feel safe as we all learn how to be parent advocates for our kids. It’s a wild ride that is best experienced when you lean on others and get the support you need.

Visit the Blog to read stories. Visit the Support page to learn more about why chatting with other families is so darn important. If you’re new to the world of limb differences, I’d love to share the five things I wish someone had told me when my daughter was born.

Let me tell you a little bit about myself. My name is Jen Lee Reeves. I’m the mom to Cameron and Jordan. Cameron was born on April Fool’s Day in 2002 and has kept us busy ever since with his incredible perceptive and honest view on life. Miss Jordan was born on December 29, 2005 and has surprised us in so many ways. Most obviously she surprised us when we discovered she was born with a full right arm and a left arm that stops after the humerus. I decided to start blogging about Jordan from the moment I found out I was pregnant… so blogging wasn’t a difficult process for me. But through the last eight years of writing, I have felt committed to making sure Cameron and Jordan get everything out of life. This website helps make that possible. My husband Randy and I have learned so much about what it takes to advocate for our children and how powerful it can be when parents work together in advocacy and support for each other. You can find me as @jenleereeves or @bornjustright on Twitter. I am the social media trainer for a national non-profit and used to teach at the Missouri School of Journalism and manage an NBC affiliate newsroom. I’m married to a journalist and professor. We love music, travel and our two kids. I have an early adoption habit when it comes to technology and I find peace in exercise. (I ran my first half marathon in May 2012!)

All opinions and thoughts posted here do not represent my employer.

I am helping launch Special Need Tech after holding a technology-focused session on special needs at the South by Southwest Festival in Austin, TX in 2012. My partner, Kate Canterbury and I are hoping to build the site into a space where anyone can learn about technology that helps our kids no matter the diagnosis.

If you’re curious about prosthetics, I’ve documented the process we went through to build Jordan’s different prosthetic arms.
2006 – Myoelectric built by Pediatric Prosthetics
2007 – Myoelectric built by Pediatric Prosthetics
2008 – Passive arm with replaceable “hands” by Scheck and Siress
2010 – Passive arm with an “elbow” and hook that opens and closes and a play arm with replaceable “hands” by Scheck and Siress
2011 – Passive arm with an elbow and hook arm that move with the help of a harness by Scheck and Siress
2013 – Passive arm with an elbow and hook arm and harness without a pin system to give more elbow flex by Scheck and Siress

 

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